CASLPM Annual Educational Conference

Full Brochure available here

Schedule at A Glance available here

Thursday 20th April  2017

Registration:      7:45 – 8:30 a.m.

Sessions:          8:30 – 12:00 noon          1:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Lunch:              12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m. (Onsite, included with Registration)

Morning Sessions 8:30 – 12:00 noon

Children and Adolescents With Concussion:

From Foundations to Clinical Practice in Speech Language Pathology

Kathryn Hardin, MA CCC-SLP, CBIST
Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Colorado

This presentation is of interest to:

  • speech – language pathologists, audiologists, and health care professionals working in both school – based and health – based practice settings and serve pediatric clients.
  • educators, parents, and care – givers

Mark Lovell has called pediatric concussion, “The most puzzling issue of concussive injury.” The developing brain poses a unique challenge to SLPs working in youth concussion both in terms of assessment and intervention.  This area has historically been under-represented in graduate training, and independent literature searches often lead to mixed information and confusion. In this session, we will separate the misinformation from the contemporary science.   Whether you are an experienced TBI clinician, exploring new areas of clinical practice, or simply want to be more aware of this public health crisis, you will leave with hands-on skills, preparing you to tackle this complex injury.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define why the recovery profile changes depending on age of the child/teen
  • Identify three concussion-critical factors that are unique to SLPs in school-based and pediatric medical settings
  • Identify three evidence-based interventions in pediatric concussion management

Kathryn Hardin is a licensed Speech-Language Pathologist, certified by the American Speech-Language Hearing Association, and a Certified Brain Injury Specialist Trainer from the Academy of Brain Injury Specialists. As an Associate Clinical Professor at the University of Colorado – Boulder, Ms. Hardin focuses in the area of adult neurogenics, with a particular emphasis in concussive injuries.

 

Enhancing Communication in Dementia: Theory and Practice

Dr. Tammy Hopper, PhD, R-SLP
Communication Sciences and Disorders University of Alberta

This presentation is of interest to:

  • speech – language pathologists, audiologists and health care professionals who provide service to adult clients
  • program providers, families, and care – givers

Dr. Hopper will share the latest information on the syndrome of dementia and its various causes and manifestations. Following this foundation, she will discuss theoretically motivated, evidence-based techniques for management of cognitive-communication disorders associated with the most common forms of dementia. Case studies and video examples will be used to illustrate specific assessment and treatment strategies.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the changing demographics of dementia
  • Explain the dementia syndrome and its common causes
  • Describe cognitive-communication functioning in common types of dementia
  • Outline assessment approaches to determine individual needs and directions for treatment
  • Use different treatment techniques and summarize research evidence associated with their use

Dr. Tammy Hopper is a Speech-Language Pathologist and professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta. Dr. Hopper has conducted research with individuals with dementia for 20 years, and has an extensive record of publications, research funding and service in this area.

 

Early Identification of Hearing Loss in Infants and Young Children using

Objective Electrophysiological Measures: Best Practices and New Research

Dr. Susan Small, PhD
University of British Columbia

This presentation is of interest to:

  • audiologists, speech – language pathologists, and health care professionals
  • program providers, support persons, families, and care – givers

This presentation will focus primarily on estimation of hearing threshold using brief-tone auditory brainstem responses (ABRs), the most commonly used method for best-practice identification of hearing loss by Early Hearing Detection & Intervention programs. Methodology, clinical protocols, and interpretation of ABRs to estimate air- and bone-conduction hearing thresholds for infants with conductive and sensory/neural hearing loss will be discussed in detail. Cases will be provided to illustrate the principles explained. A brief overview of new research investigating auditory steady-state responses and cortical auditory-evoked potentials and their potential clinical applications for the infant population will also be presented.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • conduct air–and bone–conduction auditory brainstem testing in infants
  • interpret auditory brainstem response findings for infants with normal hearing and conductive and sensory/neural hearing loss
  • explain potential clinical applications of auditory steady-state responses and cortical auditory-evoked potentials for the infant population

Susan Small is the Hamber Professor of Clinical Audiology and the Director of the Pediatric Audiology Laboratory at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Dr. Small is also a clinical audiologist with experience working with patients of all ages. Research in the Pediatric Audiology Laboratory focuses on furthering our understanding of the maturation of hearing through investigations of peripheral and central auditory processing in infancy and early childhood. One of her research areas is the early diagnosis of hearing loss using brainstem auditory evoked potentials and behavioural measures to air- and bone-conducted stimuli. She is also interested in the clinical application of objective measures such as cortical auditory-evoked potentials (e.g., onset P2-N2 and acoustic change complex) to investigate speech detectability and discrimination in infants with sensory and neural hearing losses, by addressing gaps in our knowledge in these areas, Dr. Small hopes to improve early diagnosis and management of hearing loss.

Thursday 20th April  2017   Afternoon Sessions 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Children and Adolescents with Concussion:

From Foundations to Clinical Practice in Speech Language Pathology

Kathryn Hardin, MA CCC-SLP, CBIST
Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Colorado

This session is continued from the morning.

Enhancing Communication in Dementia: Theory and Practice

 Dr. Tammy Hopper, PhD, R-SLP
Communication Sciences and Disorders University of Alberta

This session is continued from the morning.

Early Identification of Hearing Loss in Infants and Young Children using

Objective Electrophysiological Measures: Best Practices and New Research

Dr. Susan Small, PhD
University of British Columbia

This session is continued from the morning.

 

FRIDAY  21st  APRIL  2017

Registration:    7:45 – 8:30 a.m.

Sessions:         8:30 a.m. – 12:00 noon          1:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Lunch:            12:00 noon – 1:00 p.m. (Onsite, included with Registration)

Morning Sessions 8:30 a.m. to 12:00 noon

From Sports Injuries to Falls:

Roles and Responsibilities of SLPs in Adult Concussion Management

Kathryn Hardin, MA CCC-SLP, CBIST
Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Colorado

This presentation is of interest to:

  • speech – language pathologists, audiologists, and health care professionals with an interest and practice in adult neurogenics and concussion
  • program providers, support persons, families, and care – givers

As adults, we are a compendium of all our life experiences, and it is those experiences that define our personalities. In adult concussion management, this history directly impacts recovery and prognosis, and consequently, must drive our clinical intervention. Sport-related concussion often presents differently from “traumatic” concussion resulting from falls and car accidents. As SLPs, we must know how to address both in a real-world context. In this session on adult concussion, you will acquire skills for assessment and intervention well as cutting edge information on the long-term effects of concussive injuries.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define why the mechanism of the concussion impacts recovery profiles
  • Identify five referrals to consider for multidisciplinary care in acute concussion and post-concussive syndrome
  • Identify three evidence-based interventions in adult concussion management

Participants attending both days of Ms. Hardin’s presentation be advised that there will be some overlap in content in the first 1.5 hours of the talk, addressing basics of concussion.

Kathryn Hardin is a licensed Speech-Language Pathologist, certified by the American Speech-Language Hearing Association, and a Certified Brain Injury Specialist Trainer from the Academy of Brain Injury Specialists. As an Associate Clinical Professor at the University of Colorado – Boulder, Ms. Hardin focuses in the area of adult neurogenics, with a particular emphasis in concussive injuries.

 

Expanding and Improving Our Efforts Towards Hearing Loss Prevention

Dr. Thais C. Morata, Ph.D
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

This presentation is of interest to:

  • audiologists, speech – language pathologists, and health care professionals who have an interest and practice in hearing health, hearing loss prevention and care.
  • program administrators, program providers, educators, families and care – givers

Noise and hearing loss place a significant burden on society, a burden that can be measured. One way to measure this impact is to calculate disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). This is a number of healthy years lost due to a disease or other health condition. For a condition like hearing loss, the DALYs calculation takes into account life limitations caused by hearing loss as a lost portion of a healthy year of life. It is an approach that can be used to quantify the impact of hearing loss on critical intangibles, such as communication and mental health. NIOSH recently used DALYs to estimate the impact of hearing loss on quality of life. The results denote that prevention of hearing loss is a battle that requires expanding and modernizing preventive initiatives and even requires the integration of occupational safety and health protection with health promotion. Today we have fewer obstacles and more tools than were available in past decades, such as technology that allows noise measurements with smartphones, hearing protection fit testing and faster and less expensive means to communicate with the public.  Still, we still need to evaluate the effectiveness of our actions related to noise control, hearing loss and tinnitus prevention. We need to incorporate plans for research and intervention evaluations that will result in evidence-based recommendations and practices. This session will cover factors that affect our hearing health and initiatives that can impact not only individual, but society’s decisions, and determine change that improve lives.

Disclaimer: The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify scenarios where exposure to noise or music can represent a risk to healthy hearing
  • Identify sources of scientific evidence on intervention effectiveness to base decisions pertinent to the practice of hearing loss prevention
  • Identify public health approaches that could enhance an audiologist’s contribution towards the prevention of hearing loss and tinnitus

Dr. Thais C. Morata earned a doctoral degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders from the University of Cincinnati in 1990.  Currently she is a Research Audiologist at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH, Cincinnati) and the Coordinator of the National Occupational Research Agenda Manufacturing Sector Council, a network of partners and stakeholders who collaborate through activities encompassing the entire research continuum (conceiving, planning, conducting, translating, disseminating and evaluating research).  Dr. Morata created and directs the Safe-in-Sound Excellence in Hearing Loss Prevention Awards™.  She is a Founding Associate Editor for the International Journal of Audiology (from the International Society of Audiology), and a Founding Editor of the Cochrane Work Review Group. Her pioneering work in the area of noise interactions in the workplace has influenced not only NIOSH priorities and policy, but has affected national and international occupational safety and health policies.  More recently, she is devoting time to the goals of improving the communication of science to the public through new media, and promoting the evaluation of intervention effectiveness and adoption of evidence-based health practices.

 

FRIDAY  21st  APRIL  2017   Afternoon Sessions 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.

From Sports Injuries to Falls: 

Roles and Responsibilities of SLPs in Adult Concussion Management

Kathryn Hardin, MA CCC-SLP, CBIST
Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Colorado

This session is continued from the morning.

Expanding and Improving Our Efforts Towards Hearing Loss Prevention

Dr. Thais C. Morata, Ph.D
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

 This session is continued from the morning.